Category Archives: recovery

6 Things to Stop Doing Now If You’re Recovering from Alcohol Addiction

If you are currently in recovery from alcoholism, you understand what you have had to go through to get where you are. You also know how challenging it can be to stay sober and that you must do everything you can to position yourself for avoiding relapse.

It’s essential to take actionable steps each day to stay clean and build a healthy, fulfilling life. But sometimes, there are things that you need to stop doing so that you can reach your goals. Below, Just Pray NO! has listed six practices to cease immediately if you are in recovery.

1. Working an Unhealthy Job

When you are in recovery, stress can be one of the biggest triggers for relapse. And one of the most common sources of stress for adults in the workplace. If your current job is leaving you overwhelmed, or if you simply don’t like it, it might be time to change careers. Don’t let your demotivation, irritability, anxiety, or lack of concentration keep you from recovering or building a fulfilling life.

2. Ignoring Your Triggers

“Trigger” is a well-known term for those recovering from addiction and other obstacles. One of the most important things you can do to stay sober and improve your wellbeing is to understand your external triggers.

Your triggers may be places, things, situations, people, or anything else that leaves you craving or thinking about alcohol. Moreover, understand that your internal triggers can also set you back, including your thoughts, emotions, and feelings about alcohol. After identifying your triggers, begin structuring your life so that you can avoid them.

3. Ignoring the Warning Signs

Similar to triggers, it’s essential to recognize the warning signs that you are headed towards a relapse. In many cases, a relapse sneaks up on you, and knowing what signs to look for can keep that from happening. If you have been going back to your addictive thinking patterns, behaving more recklessly, thinking irrationally, engaging in self-defeating behavior, or justifying the use of alcohol for any reason, it could be time to take a breath and focus on your recovery.

4. Continuing Old Routines

Maintaining old routines can quickly lead to relapse. If you neglect to change your circumstances and spend time with the people you associate with alcohol, it will be challenging to stay sober for the long haul. Think of anyways that you can revamp your routine so that you can begin developing healthy habits.

5. Isolating Yourself      

Healthy relationships are key to staying sober. You cannot expect yourself to avoid alcohol if you keep hanging out with your drinking babies. At the same time, you cannot isolate yourself. The best approach is to focus on the friends and family members with whom you have positive relationships.

You will also need to get any support you need. Many people in alcohol recovery meet with a support group regularly, which can provide you with a sense of camaraderie and wisdom on how to stay sober and healthy.

6. Avoiding Self-Care

Finally, a major aspect of your recovery will be fostering your physical, mental, and emotional health each day. Not only will improving your health help you stay sober, but it will also benefit virtually every part of your life. Make sure you are eating a nutritious balanced diet and exercising at least five days a week. And if you have trouble getting at least seven hours of sleep per life, figure out a relaxing activity or two that will help you unwind. Furthermore, consider finding a hobby that helps you relax. Whether it’s going hiking, building birdhouses, or planting a garden, try to do your hobby at least once a week. Make sure your home functions as a safe haven as well. To ensure it remains a sanctuary, keep it clean, decluttering and free of negativity.

Recovering from alcoholism is one of the hardest and bravest tasks you could ever take on. You want to make sure you don’t make it more difficult than necessary. Remember the six things above and try to structure your life in a way that helps you avoid doing them. And never stop looking for other ways to build a healthy, fulfilling life.

Article Submitted by Dylan Wallace info@preventionconnect.org

Here Are the Best Tips for Planning Your Clean Getaway

Planning a sober vacation may sound tough if you are a recovering addict. However, you have many great options for a fun and relaxing vacation. “Just Pray NO!” shares the best tips for setting yourself up for a successful getaway.

Benefits of travel. Travel is excellent for your mental health. Some studies show that travel reduces stress, puts you in a better mood, keeps you physically active, strengthens relationships, and sharpens your mind. You might even decide to go solo. U.S. News & World Report notes that getting out of your routine, being in a new place and around different people opens your mind to self-discovery. It’s easy to see how a vacation can help you in your recovery.

Get away and avoid triggers. According to some experts, it’s healthy to break your routine and do something fun during recovery. One of the most important things you can do to protect yourself from relapse is to avoid triggers. By getting out of town, you change up your routine and get away from your normal stressors.

Plan your getaway. It may seem challenging to plan a sober vacation. USA Today explains, “it can be difficult for sober people to feel at ease traveling, especially when so many resorts and hotels encourage drinking.” Fortunately you have some great choices available to you that fit a variety of budgets and interests.

Sober retreats. One of the options available is a sober retreat. Groups of recovering addicts travel together with activities and outings structured around staying clean and having a blast. Themed trips are available with diverse options such as safaris, skiing, and beaches. As you enjoy time away with fellow recovering addicts, you’ll see firsthand the truth behind 1 Corinthians 10:13: “No temptation has overtaken you except what is common to mankind. And God is faithful; he will not let you be tempted beyond what you can bear. But when you are tempted, he will also provide a way out so that you can endure it.”

National Parks. Explore National Parks to see everything from glaciers to geysers.

Sober music festivals. Enjoying concerts is probably something you wrote off when you gave up your bad habit. Music festivals typically are a haven for drugs and alcohol. Fortunately there are now sober options for people who want to revel in music substance-free.

Sun worship, diving and snorkeling. Some sun, sea and sand may be the vacation you have in mind.

Tips for your trip. Whatever you choose, here are some important tips from Psychology Today that will help you stay sober on your vacation:

  • Talk to your companions about your trip. If you have traveling companions, communication is key. Discuss the importance of your sobriety and how they can be supportive. Voice concerns you may have and what roles you expect everyone to play.
  • Take care of yourself. Eat right, exercise, and get enough sleep. 
  • Plan for fun. Schedule events ahead of time so you have structure through your trip.
  • Stay positive. Remember that if someone else is choosing to abuse a substance you are making a healthy choice by staying sober.
  • Keep in touch. Maintain contact with your support network.
  • Good timing. Go on your trip when you are in a stable part of your recovery.
  • Choose carefully. Cancun during spring break or Germany during Oktoberfest are unwise options. Think through places and dates that will support your good decisions.
  • Be prepared for triggers. When you have downtime next to a bar or have travel delays, have a book handy, enjoy fun apps on your phone, or pull out a pillow and sleep mask to provide relief. When you encounter a stressful situation, like a missed flight or a stolen wallet, incorporate some stress management techniques.
  • Plan for emergencies. Plan for the worst when traveling abroad. For example, if your wallet is lost or stolen in a foreign locale like Bejing or Manila, your family can quickly – and affordably – send you funds through a secure service like Remitly. Fees are never higher than $2.99 when transferring funds to China, for example, and you can use Alipay or WeChat to expedite the process.

Your clean getaway. You’ve worked hard to get clean and it may sound challenging to arrange a sober vacation. With careful planning your vacation is a step in your recovery program. You avoid triggers and break your routine. Make good choices and set yourself up for success. By using the tools at your disposal, you can have a wonderful time. Follow these great tips and enjoy a clean getaway!

“Just Pray NO!” seeks to unite Christians in spiritual warfare to battle addiction. Reach out for more info today! justprayno@aol.com

Article Submitted by Dylan Wallace info@preventionconnect.org